In Remembrance of a Life Well-Lived

 

The reality is that you will grieve forever.  You will not get over the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it.  You will heal and you will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered.  You will be whole again, but you will never be the same again. Nor should you be the same…….nor should you want to.  –Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

Today our family will pause to remember Crick at a Mass said for him on this eighth anniversary of his death.   As I continue to feel this need to chronicle and preserve the story that was uniquely his, I am once again sharing this video I made seven years ago.  In addition, I have included several recollections from family and friends which speak volumes about how one “glass half-full” life has touched so many.

The heart, like the mind has a memory, and in it are kept the most precious keepsakes.  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“I remember when Crick took us outside one winter to build, not just a typical snowman, but our very own igloo!!  We built it so big it lasted until almost spring!  He also helped me to buy my very first car, it was a stick shift and he helped me learn how to drive it and, after many hours of practice, he suggested that we take the car for a test drive up Cooke Rd. to see if I could handle it on a hill.  Well…..I couldn’t make it up the first hill and we kept drifting backwards toward the car behind us.  Finally, Crick put his foot over mine on the accelerator and away we went.  I think his exact words to me were, “Well, you can always sell this car to someone else!”.  He would always beg me to walk on his back and promise to give me all of the change in his pocket.  Boy, was I naive, thinking I was going to make a lot of money.  But……..he did teach me the value of a quarter!!!  Over the years, Crick would put a lot on his back for our family.”

“I started thinking about how long I have known Crick…………it has been basically my whole life!!  I remember sitting in our living room on Oakland Park and talking into a reel to reel tape recorder to say “hi” to him when he was stationed in Korea and then he would send the tape back to us so that we could hear his voice.  Crick was also there for Jimmy……there was the day that Jimmy was hiding in the bushes in front of our house and Crick went out to gently remind Jimmy that he was at home and not back in Viet Nam.  Who else but a veteran like Crick could have known what Jimmy was going through. Crick was also there when I was going to enlist in the Army Reserves and he was going to make sure that I ended up in his unit so that he could watch over me………..he even went to the commander to make sure this would happen.  For some reason I never did enlist, but I always knew that Crick was going to be there for me.  Crick has been and always will be one of my brothers!!”

“It seems like a long time ago that Crick and I were standing on the field at St. Michael’s in our wildly unprotective football gear……paper thin shoulder pads, helmets with no face guards or chin straps, and for me,…………fearing the fact that I would have to tackle his older brother, John as he came blasting through the line. Life seems to warp into hyper-speed as we grow older. I must say that although Crick and I were never terribly close growing up, I have fond memories of him: caddying with him at York Temple, the fact that he seemed to instinctively know how car engines worked, and how he always exuded this sort of Gary Cooper type…….tall, dependable, good-hearted vibe, even as a kid. And if his presence is still felt by someone as distant as I am to him, I can only imagine what his presence means to all of those who are truly close to him. It speaks volumes about how Crick has journeyed through this life.”

And so it is that as another year passes, our family continues to honor Crick’s memory by drinking of the “glass half-full” and being “grateful that we are able to put two feet on the floor”.

May his soul, and the souls of all of the faithful departed on this All Souls Day, rest in peace.  Amen

TGW (the good wife)

 

5 thoughts on “In Remembrance of a Life Well-Lived

    1. Thank you, Janie. I know you experience so many similar emotions. I so appreciate your reading my memories…it does bring me much comfort knowing others also are remembering him. Sending you hugs.

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  1. Thank you for sharing. How blest you are to have such beautiful reflections from family and friends to warm your hearts with sweet memories. I always love hearing how he was the eternal optimist. Such a life sustaining trait!

    I was most fortunate to be working at University of Illinois medical center in Chicago when Kubler-Ross came to be at small our team meetings! Her work was being seriously recognized. She was working at the time at University of Chicago Medical Center just around the corner from us. She gave us such a wonderful insight and a “mental tool” not only to help our serously ill patients but for us to take through life to deal with our future losses. Sending you a big hug Sent from my iPad

    >>

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  2. Thank you, Janie. I know you experience so many similar emotions. I so appreciate your reading my memories…it does bring me much comfort knowing others also are remembering him. Sending you hugs.

    Like

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